Brown Field Investment

Brown Field Investment : Eagle Property Investments : Investment Property Management Group.

Brown Field Investment

    brown field investment

  • FDI that involves the purchase of an existing plant or firm, rather then construction of a new plant. Contrasts with green field investment.
brown field investment

brown field investment – New Zealand

New Zealand and Its Aborigines: Being an Account of the Aborigines, Trade, and Resources of the Colony; and the Advantages It Now Presents As a Field for Emigration and the Investment of Capital
New Zealand and Its Aborigines: Being an Account of the Aborigines, Trade, and Resources of the Colony; and the Advantages It Now Presents As a Field for Emigration and the Investment of Capital
This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR’d book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

T.R. Brown & Sons Ltd (Bristol)

T.R. Brown & Sons Ltd (Bristol)
Book Review (May 2008)

T.R.Brown of Bristol By Captain Stephen Carter. ISBN 090629460-6. Published by Twelveheads Press, Truro, 2006 Softback,104 pp, illustrated with numerous photographs and map of River Avon and docks.

Many books have been written about the exploits and adventures of major shipping companies and their vessels, but we should remember the important part played by the businesses which supported the commerce of the sea by providing services in port and dealing with the occasional mishap.

Such a business was that of T.R.Brown and Sons Ltd which began to take advantage of the need for towage and lighterage on the Bristol Avon and in both the City Docks and the new ones at Avonmouth in the late nineteenth century.

Stephen Carter’s book admirably covers the long history of the company, which still operates, admittedly in a different field, and he draws upon the memories of the many men, including himself, who were involved in the day to day business of handling ships and barges in the docks and on the river. Indeed, that business extended out into the sometimes inhospitable waters of the Bristol Channel and Severn estuary.

Across the estuary from Chepstow came a trowman by the name of Thomas Robert Brown who had, from his humble beginnings in that cradle of seafarers, already expanded his ownership of a small fleet of trows by the time he arrived in Bristol probably in the 1870s, and put them to work ferrying cargoes from the new Avonmouth docks up river to the industries of central Bristol. Much of this business was the carriage of grain up river at a time when the mills were operating around the City docks. When larger mills were erected at Avonmouth, the expected loss of traffic did not materialize; it merely changed into more barge work around the larger docks and Browns were there to capitalize on it.

There were, of course, other well known firms in the barge and lighterage trades in Bristol, Heads carried mostly timber, Ashmeads wood pulp to the board mills above the City docks, Perrys handled tobacco imports and Raes dealt with coal bunkering as did Smiths. All these companies worked quite closely together since they did not directly compete and there was enough work for all in those busy far-off days when Bristol depended upon its river and central docks.

Brown did not stand still: Stephen Carter relates the story of how he entered the salvage business when a Danish ship caught fire in King Road and was abandoned. Brown put some of his own crew aboard who extinguished the fire, and the ship was towed into Avonmouth where the Danish master, after attempting unsuccessfully to re-board his ship (Carter says it had something to do with an axe being wielded by Brown!) was advised that the ship was subject to a salvage claim which was finally awarded to Brown. The company continued to successfully practice salvage well into the latter part of the twentieth century and the book sets out in detail some of the operations undertaken such as the raising of the steamer Cato in Avonmouth docks in 1963.

Further evidence for the enterprising nature of the company comes when they moved into sand and gravel dredging in 1924, a lucrative business which latterly became the Holms Sand and Gravel co. which operated from the Grove in the City docks, and latterly at Hotwells, until the late 1970s when the "gentrification" of the City docks began. One of the early dredgers which continued to operate in this business was the Portway, built at the Albion yard of Charles Hill in 1927. She also had side tanks which when the ship was not dredging sand, could be used to carry fuel oil for bunkering; another example of clever business practice.

Carter’s book concludes with the decline of the maritime side of the firm but points out that it continues to flourish in the property and investment fields. The book is a good account of a long running and enterprising maritime business which made its mark on Bristol for many years and was looked up to as an exemplary employer.

Rub this brick and the Cubs will win today

Rub this brick and the Cubs will win today
At Wrigley Field, you can pay about $150 and get a brick placed in front of the ballpark with your very own inscription. My brick says, "RUB THIS BRICK AND THE CUBS WILL WIN TODAY". I was the 41st person to order a brick. There’s hundreds, maybe thousands of custom bricks in front of Wrlgley Field. You can find my brick in the Sammy Sosa section. (No, I did not request to have the brick placed there.)

Most people put boring messagse on their bricks like, "The Johnson family loves the Cubs". Boring. I think my brick is the reason for the Cubs being in first place this season.

As part of my order, I received a duplicate brick which resides in my home. Actually, my brother paid for about half of the brick. And a good friend put in $10. So it’s currently a three-partner investment.

Polaroid photograph taken 9/21/2007

brown field investment
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